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B.C. mining company forms ground water exploration syndicate


June 9, 2015
By Ground Water Canada

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June 9, 2015, Vancouver – Mining company Canadian International Minerals Inc. has formed the Pacific Aquifer Exploration
Syndicate for the purpose of exploring for
potable ground water resources in North America.

June 9, 2015, Vancouver – Mining company Canadian International Minerals Inc. has formed the Pacific Aquifer Exploration
Syndicate for the purpose of exploring for
potable ground water resources in North America.

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The syndicate will be joined by DG Resource Management Ltd., a private resource exploration company based out of Edmonton, and Strategic Staking & Exploration Inc., a private resource exploration company based out of Vancouver.


The exploration for potable water resources in North America has been largely ignored as the public perception has been that sources and supply are abundant and inexpensive, Canadian International Minerals said in a news release. In recent years, however, there has been a major increase of public interest in water rights and supplies, as climate change events such as droughts, floods, and boil-water advisories have highlighted the scarcity and volatility of potable water supplies.


Extensive hydrogeological databases have been developed by various levels of government across the continent. These databases are comparable in scope to those which exist for other natural resources, and will be invaluable for planning exploration efforts, it said. The potable water resource is compatible to the flowing royalty and private-public business model. It is transportable and is not recyclable like agricultural or industrial water.


The Pacific Aquifer Exploration
Syndicate
will apply standard geological principles in identifying targets, and will apply for commercial water rights once targets have been defined. The principal targets are aquifers underground layers of water-bearing permeable rock or
unconsolidated materials (gravel, sand, or silt) where ground water
accumulates and is naturally replenished by the infiltration of water
from precipitation.


"When evaluating natural resource development projects, it is important to understand the perceptions, opinions and beliefs held by both the local population and society at large. Projects lacking social licence incur delays and costs which can stifle development, and impact the proponent's reputation," the release said.


"Early and continuous engagement with local communities, aboriginal groups, and all levels of government is vital to achieving mutual prosperity. The Syndicate is committed to engaging with all stakeholders."