Contamination
Harrietsfield, N.S. – A city in Nova Scotia has suggested installing a water pipe system that would cost homeowners $26,000 per household to access clean municipal water after their water was contaminated. Residents are considering other options, including installing a cistern system and wells. Global News reports. | READ MORE
The U.S. craft brewing industry is increasingly concerned about the Trump administration’s attempt to deregulate the 1972 Clean Water Act. Sixty breweries filed a brief in July in support of environmental advocates who are fighting the deregulation attempt in a case before the Supreme Court. NBC News reports. | READ MORE
Eabametoong First Nation, Ont. – A First Nation in northern Ontario has declared a state of emergency after tests showed high levels of chemicals in the water supply that are byproducts of treatment materials like chlorine interacting with naturally occurring compounds. CTV News/The Canadian Press reports. | READ MORE
Sherwood Park, Alta. – Utility company Epco will add orthophosphate, a lead inhibitor, to drinking water at its two water treatment plants that serve the Edmonton region by the end of 2020. The move was a result of updated guidelines in March for lead content in drinking water by Health Canada. The Sherwood Park - Strathcona County News reports. | READ MORE
Calgary – For three years now, the City of Calgary and Alberta Health Services have issued warnings to those who want to dip, plunge or splash in the Elbow River, but the source of the fecal contamination remains a mystery. The City says the issue is likely a combination of factors, from leaky pipes to ground water. CBC News reports. | READ MORE
Treat the disease, not the symptoms. That’s what medical experts always tell us.
Ottawa – The number of long-term drinking water advisories affecting public systems on reserves has declined from 105 in November 2015, to 58 as of May 31, the federal government said as part of a monthly progress update on its commitment to end the advisories.
Albany, NY – Drinking water contaminants can be found in 176 waterways throughout the New York State, according to a new report released by the non-profit, non-partisan New York Public Interest Research Group. The Democrat & Chronicle reports. | READ MORE
Evart, MI – U.S. scientists are now measuring water levels near Evart, Mich., where Nestle plans to increase its ground water extraction for bottling under a controversial permit issued by Michigan regulators last year. MLive.com reports. | READ MORE
Dallas, TX – Drinking water that is contaminated with arsenic may lead to thickening of the heart’s main pumping chamber in young adults, a structural change that increases the risk for future heart problems, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging, an American Heart Association journal.
Bangladesh – A new study suggests testing and switching of wells and private intermediate wells may be the most viable strategies for cleaning up arsenic-contaminated water supplies in Bangladesh. The Earth Institute at Columbia University reports. | READ MORE
Detroit – Michigan’s search for PFAS contamination now touches the Gordie Howe International Bridge, where multiple samples over four months on the Detroit side of the joint Windsor, Ont.-Detroit project showed the chemicals in both soil and ground water. MLive.com reports. | READ MORE
Sicamous, B.C. – Ground water near the landfill in the municipality of Sicamous in the Shuswap region of British Columbia shows levels of various substances that exceed provincial standards, according to an environmental monitoring report. Summerland Review reports. | READ MORE
Ottawa – The federal government is on track with its pledge to end long-term boil-water advisories on First Nations reserves, but the overall reliability of the underlying water systems is little improved since the Liberal party came to power, according to a Globe and Mail analysis. | READ MORE
Victoria – New rules for agricultural waste management will better protect B.C.’s water and provide more clarity for the agricultural sector, the B.C. Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy said in a news release.
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