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Chicago company, Nature Conservancy partner on Great Lakes project


November 18, 2014
By Ground Water Canada

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Nov. 18, 2014, Chicago – A cleaning products manufacturer will partner
with The Nature Conservancy on a Great Lakes ground water replenishment
project. 

Nov. 18, 2014, Chicago – A cleaning products manufacturer will partner with The Nature Conservancy on a Great Lakes ground water replenishment project. 

By offering incentives to
farmers to increase ground water recharge, the project aims to
protect water in the Great Lakes' watershed and improve water quality
throughout the area with this program, said Method Products in a news release.

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The company is
supporting The Nature Conservancy's efforts to protect and restore
priority watersheds and support sustainable land use practices in the
Great Lakes. Through this
water recharge program, Method's goal is to replenish ground water in
equal amounts to the water used in its factory, targeting 30 million
gallons of ground water recharge over five years.

 

"As a native of the
Great Lakes region, protecting the water we draw from to make our
products is particularly important to me," said Adam Lowry, co-founder and chief greenskeeper at Method, in the release. "We considered all paths
to determine the most sustainable use of water and decided to partner
with The Nature Conservancy and Michigan State University's Institute for Water Research for this program because it is highly traceable, accountable, and ecologically relevant."

 

"The
Nature Conservancy is excited to partner with Method to promote
sustainable farming practices that restore and protect the Great Lakes,"
said Mark Tercek, president and chief executive officer of
The Nature Conservancy. 

 

In addition to the ground water recharge project, the company is installing bioswales in its
soon-to-open manufacturing facility through which storm water is captured and filtered back
into the ground rather than burdening the city's storm water system.